Оригинальный дом на воде bamboo house courtyard — единение с природой от harmony world consulting #038; design, китай

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Bamboo Courtyard Teahouse by HWCD Associates

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More bamboo: this floating tea house in Yangzhou, by Chinese architects HWCD Associates, features brick rooms linked by louvred bamboo corr >

Situated in the ShiQiao garden in Yangzhou, a city to the northwest of Shanghai, the tea house is organised in asymmetric cubes on a lake.

Tall rows of bamboo create corridors along the outdoor walkway. The bamboo is arranged vertically and horizontally to produce “interesting depth” and visual effects as you walk around, the architects told Dezeen.

Lights are inset into the door frames, providing a glowing pathway between the grey brick buildings.

Here’s some more information from the architects:

Tea, one of China’s most precious culture heritages has remained popular throughout the thousands of years. As tea leaves come from modest tea trees, through the long process of picking the leaves, drying the leaves and finally produces a cup of tea.

Thus, tea requires an unassuming setting in order to understand its lengthy process. Today, the appreciation of Chinese tea has become an art and furthermore, many teahouses are designed for this purpose.

Amongst the lush ShiQiao garden, stands this humble tea house which embraces the traditional Chinese garden fundamentals while blending into the natural environment.

The tea house is known as the bamboo courtyard as it mainly uses bamboo to create an interesting play of vertical and horizontal lines. In some spaces, the vertical and horizontal elements intensify to form a psychedelic perspective, evoking a profound sensory perception.

Traditionally, Yangzhou courtyards are formed with inward facing pavilions, creating an internal landscape space. So, drawing inspiration from this, the bamboo courtyard was designed from a basic square footprint, fragmented into small spaces to create an internal landscape area. Each of the spaces has views into the surrounding lake, allowing a panoramic view of the area.

As one walks through the bamboo courtyard, the asymmetrical corridors present an intentional semi-obstructed vision with the layering of bamboos.

There is a strong experiential sense of space, layered from one to another; from totally open to the internal lake to narrow spaces between the rough brick finish and bamboo curtain.

Section – click above for larger image

From the exterior, the bamboo courtyard has a cube form with a variation of solids and voids. The strong verticality becomes more apparent at night when the teahouse lights up to illuminate the surroundings. The simple form illustrates the harmonious blending of architecture with nature.

Moreover, the natural materials such as bamboo and bricks have low embodied energy and low impact on the environment. The pocket of voids improves natural ventilation within the bamboo courtyard while the thick brick wall retains heat in winter, reducing the dependency of mechanical heating and cooling system.

One who appreciates tea would understand that every serving of tea differs in colour, scent and taste even if it is from the same pot. There is a layering of experience in enjoying every cup of tea. Thus, the bamboo courtyard is an abstraction of the tea experience, creating layers of experience through spaces.

If tea is an art and architecture is a way of life, then the bamboo courtyard is the portrait of the both worlds.

Location: ShiQiao, Yangzhou
Client: Building And Construction Authority of YangZhou Economic and Technological Development Zone
Client-side Project Manager: YaoQiang
Design Firm: Harmony World Consulting & Design (HWCD)
Design-partner-in-charge: Sun Wei, Shi Jun
Building Area: 400m2
Completed: May 2012

bamboo architecture and design (249 articles)

bamboo is a woody grass that is known to be the fastest-growing plant in the world. it has become a popular material choice in architecture and design projects because of its sustainable qualities and hardwearing characteristics as it has a higher compressive strength than concrete or wood, and rivals the tensility of steel.

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the furniture piece is composed of oak and bamboo, side by side, to symbolize yamamoto’s japanese and german influences.

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atelier cnS works with local weavers to build the changqi stadium bamboo corr >the bamboo corridor is sited alongside the changqi basketball court, utilizing local bamboo and traditional weaving techniques.

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TOROO demonstrates how bamboo can enable unique and versatile architectural solutions rooted in local culture and sustainable development.

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peter steinhauer captures the colorful bamboo scaffolding dressing hong kong’s skyscrapers

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caged up to 80 stories high and dressed in colorful swathes, they appear as death-defying cocoons which scaffolders scale with eye-watering risk.

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gr >balancing the industrial style of the reflecting surface, the weaving brings a human touch into the piece.

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A bamboo beach house in Mustique designed by Veere Grenney

On the Caribbean island of Mustique, interior designer Veere Grenney has redesigned a bamboo house that is a study in neutrals and natural materials, set off by the green of the palms outside and the glorious blue of the ocean

M ustique, in the Saint Vincent and the Grenadines group of Caribbean islands, is just 2.2 square miles, yet it exerts a fascination far beyond its size. The 3rd Baron Glenconner, Colin Tennant, who bought the island in 1958 for £45,000, had hoped to grow cotton there. When that plan failed, he decided to make it into an exclusive holiday setting for his friends and divided the island into 120 plots. In 1960, in a brilliant PR coup, he gave the first 10-acre site to his friend Princess Margaret. Her home, Les Jolies Eaux, was decorated in a cosy, Home Counties Peter Jones style, but since then, the island has attracted the mega rich, some of whom look on a plot as their chance to build a fantasy home in the shape of a Roman palazzo, a Japanese temple or a high-tech, futuristic box.

Interior designer Veere Grenney knows Mustique well, and had already designed half a dozen homes for this client before he bought one of the island’s most unusual houses in 2007. Veere describes it as ‘a beach folly, a little Robinson Crusoe bamboo paradise’. The original house had been built in the Seventies by the Swedish architect Arne Hasselqvist for the American advertising dynamo Mary Wells Lawrence and her airline president husband Harding Lawrence. They used the place almost as a bathing hut for their vast home at the top of the island.

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When Veere and his team first encountered the house in 2008, a tropical storm had ripped off some of the roofing and caused a cliff fall below the house. They walked into the main building to discover the original Serge Roche standard lamps encrusted with debris and dust, the shell wall lights wrecked and the bamboo wallcovering looking shabby. With the help of architect Alain Bouvier of ABA, Veere stripped everything back to its bones, expanded the living space, installed a new larger kitchen and reconfigured many of the rooms.

The main building – two separate side pavilions house the main bedroom, spare rooms and children’s rooms – includes the great room, a magnificent living space at the top of the house. At 15 metres long, it is a combined sitting and dining area, its walls and pitched ceiling completely re-clad in 10cm-diameter cured bamboo stalks. It is open to the elements on four sides, so sea breezes keep it cool, although storm windows are stored in cupboards for when bad weather threatens. The room faces west and gets beautiful afternoon light and a grandstand view of the daily extravaganza of the Caribbean sunset.

The bamboo, a traditional building material in the Grenadines, came from nearby Saint Vincent, where it is always harvested when the moon is on the wane. The belief is that termites quickly devour any bamboo cut when the sap is rising, even once the wood is cured. The team then went in search of vintage bamboo furniture and bought it in container loads, mostly from Los Angeles and Miami, and often through 1stdibs. The coffee tables and side cabinets in the great room were designed by Veere Grenney Associates and made by Lincoln Cato, and Soane made replicas of one of the original shell sconces for the walls. Rush matting was laid on the sustainable sapele wood floors and Veere asked Raoul Textiles to recolour its huge palm-leaf design ‘Exoticus’ in bamboo shades for the sofa covers.

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The main bedroom suite in a side pavilion continues the bamboo theme. Nothing is allowed to jar with the warm, woody atmosphere – even the bathrooms have vintage copper bathtubs with black and weathered-bronze taps. ‘We didn’t want that white porcelain glare,’ says Veere. The blue of the sky and sea and the vivid green of the lush vegetation are the only colours allowed. Plants surround a new space down at sea level, too, where there is an outdoor covered dining area with a small kitchen and shower, and a perfect spot for sunbathing. From here, you can dive or flop straight into the blue water of Gelliceaux Bay beach.

It is a favourite spot for the owner. Although he is the proprietor of the Savile Row tailor Huntsman, he prefers to entertain here in bare feet and shorts. ‘You can have 30 people for lunch on the water and they can go straight from the dining table to the sea – it’s like your own private gigantic salt-water swimming pool,’ he says. Houses with direct access to an empty white-sand beach are rare, even in Mustique. He loves the spare aesthetic of the bamboo, too. ‘It is not overwhelming, just a very simple and pure design, not trying to impress, nestled in the leaves, just hanging on the cliff. It’s just unique,’ he says. The unassuming aspect of Mustique is what first attracted him to the island. ‘There are no big shops, no jet skis, no sun loungers on the beach. It’s in many ways the most simple place with the most sophisticated people’.

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A bamboo beach house in Mustique designed by Veere Grenney

On the Caribbean island of Mustique, interior designer Veere Grenney has redesigned a bamboo house that is a study in neutrals and natural materials, set off by the green of the palms outside and the glorious blue of the ocean

M ustique, in the Saint Vincent and the Grenadines group of Caribbean islands, is just 2.2 square miles, yet it exerts a fascination far beyond its size. The 3rd Baron Glenconner, Colin Tennant, who bought the island in 1958 for £45,000, had hoped to grow cotton there. When that plan failed, he decided to make it into an exclusive holiday setting for his friends and divided the island into 120 plots. In 1960, in a brilliant PR coup, he gave the first 10-acre site to his friend Princess Margaret. Her home, Les Jolies Eaux, was decorated in a cosy, Home Counties Peter Jones style, but since then, the island has attracted the mega rich, some of whom look on a plot as their chance to build a fantasy home in the shape of a Roman palazzo, a Japanese temple or a high-tech, futuristic box.

Interior designer Veere Grenney knows Mustique well, and had already designed half a dozen homes for this client before he bought one of the island’s most unusual houses in 2007. Veere describes it as ‘a beach folly, a little Robinson Crusoe bamboo paradise’. The original house had been built in the Seventies by the Swedish architect Arne Hasselqvist for the American advertising dynamo Mary Wells Lawrence and her airline president husband Harding Lawrence. They used the place almost as a bathing hut for their vast home at the top of the island.

Advertisement

When Veere and his team first encountered the house in 2008, a tropical storm had ripped off some of the roofing and caused a cliff fall below the house. They walked into the main building to discover the original Serge Roche standard lamps encrusted with debris and dust, the shell wall lights wrecked and the bamboo wallcovering looking shabby. With the help of architect Alain Bouvier of ABA, Veere stripped everything back to its bones, expanded the living space, installed a new larger kitchen and reconfigured many of the rooms.

The main building – two separate side pavilions house the main bedroom, spare rooms and children’s rooms – includes the great room, a magnificent living space at the top of the house. At 15 metres long, it is a combined sitting and dining area, its walls and pitched ceiling completely re-clad in 10cm-diameter cured bamboo stalks. It is open to the elements on four sides, so sea breezes keep it cool, although storm windows are stored in cupboards for when bad weather threatens. The room faces west and gets beautiful afternoon light and a grandstand view of the daily extravaganza of the Caribbean sunset.

The bamboo, a traditional building material in the Grenadines, came from nearby Saint Vincent, where it is always harvested when the moon is on the wane. The belief is that termites quickly devour any bamboo cut when the sap is rising, even once the wood is cured. The team then went in search of vintage bamboo furniture and bought it in container loads, mostly from Los Angeles and Miami, and often through 1stdibs. The coffee tables and side cabinets in the great room were designed by Veere Grenney Associates and made by Lincoln Cato, and Soane made replicas of one of the original shell sconces for the walls. Rush matting was laid on the sustainable sapele wood floors and Veere asked Raoul Textiles to recolour its huge palm-leaf design ‘Exoticus’ in bamboo shades for the sofa covers.

Advertisement

The main bedroom suite in a side pavilion continues the bamboo theme. Nothing is allowed to jar with the warm, woody atmosphere – even the bathrooms have vintage copper bathtubs with black and weathered-bronze taps. ‘We didn’t want that white porcelain glare,’ says Veere. The blue of the sky and sea and the vivid green of the lush vegetation are the only colours allowed. Plants surround a new space down at sea level, too, where there is an outdoor covered dining area with a small kitchen and shower, and a perfect spot for sunbathing. From here, you can dive or flop straight into the blue water of Gelliceaux Bay beach.

It is a favourite spot for the owner. Although he is the proprietor of the Savile Row tailor Huntsman, he prefers to entertain here in bare feet and shorts. ‘You can have 30 people for lunch on the water and they can go straight from the dining table to the sea – it’s like your own private gigantic salt-water swimming pool,’ he says. Houses with direct access to an empty white-sand beach are rare, even in Mustique. He loves the spare aesthetic of the bamboo, too. ‘It is not overwhelming, just a very simple and pure design, not trying to impress, nestled in the leaves, just hanging on the cliff. It’s just unique,’ he says. The unassuming aspect of Mustique is what first attracted him to the island. ‘There are no big shops, no jet skis, no sun loungers on the beach. It’s in many ways the most simple place with the most sophisticated people’.

Top 50 Modern House Designs Ever Built!

Yup, this is the photo-list of top 50 modern house designs ever built. Some of those homes are seriously popular on the internet which is just another proof of how incredible they are and another reason for you to check them out. Take a look!

Of course, all of those modern house designs are chosen according to my personal taste, so you don’t have to agree about being the best part, because, as everybody else of course, you have your own taste in modern houses. But after you see those photos below, I expect you to at least admit that those homes are truly incredible pieces of modern architecture. Btw. you might want to take a look at the 30 modern entrances later as well.

Location and modern house designs

What makes these modern house designs so special and different from others? Well, one of the criteria was location of the house, which often plays important role in the way house is designed. For example, houses designed by SAOTA, are almost always built somewhere on a cliff, high above the ocean, or down on a rocky beach, giving its residents an opportunity to enjoy in breathtaking views or relaxing sounds that ocean waves make while crashing into the rocks below the house. Nature will always have huge impact on the house design.

House size

Next, size of the house. Common opinion among people is that house has to be huge or expensive to be beautiful or amazing. This is really, really far from being true. You will notice I picked some pretty small houses (in comparison to others) for this list. For example, this minimalist house and this creative home. Good architects and their clients who have taste and style will together create gorgeous modern house designs, no matter how big the house is at the end.

Architectural style

Speaking of style, this brings us to the next criteria. Style in architecture. This is another thing strongly related to someone’s personality, but you have to admit, when someone has style, this is obvious to everyone. I think architects and owners of those homes have amazing style in architecture and this is one of the reasons why I put those homes on the list.

“The wow factor” of modern house designs

When we take all criteria described above, we get one and only, “the wow factor”. When you see modern home and its design, you’re either impressed, or not impressed. This can be described as “the wow factor”, and, at the end, this is the main reason why those homes are on this list. All of them attracted my attention, got me all interested and left me impressed, which made me put together this list of top 50 modern house designs at the end.

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Let’s take a look!

Modern front facade design

Front facade is probably the most important part of every house design. Since it is facing public area, it is essential to make sure that the house blends well with the surrounding and fits in the neighborhood in general. These two houses, designed by Antoni Associates (you can read more about this modern mansion here) and Martin Friedrich Architects, are great examples of elegance and overall sophistication of modern house design, especially when it comes to front facade.

© Elsa Young and Adam Letch © Derek Swalwell

Exterior house design facing the backyard

Even though front facade is of somewhat greater importance when it comes to a house design, the backyard facade is far from being unimportant. Next two modern houses are perfect examples of exterior house design facing the backyard where modern house design is complemented with terraces, swimming pools and gardens. You can read more about Double Bay residence and its amazing house design here.

© Zhao Qiang

Green roof as part of modern house design

Green roofs are often being used as a key element in sustainable housing. Besides being good for the environment and your home’s overall sustainability, they also add value to a visual appearance of the house. Singapore’s Sky Garden House designed by Guz Architects shows an outstanding green roof being part of the modern house design.

© Patrick Bingham Hall

Big modern house design

Wider Los Angeles area, especially Hollywood, Bel Air and Beverly Hills are packed with breathtaking modern mansions. While big modern houses might not be everyone’s cup of tea, they can be really interesting and impressive pieces of architecture. Just like this modern mansion on 1232 Sunset Plaza Drive.

© The Agency

Small house design

Some people simply prefer smaller houses instead of big imposing mansions. An no one can blame them since small modern homes often really do look more charming and beautiful than large houses. Shakin Stevens House designed by Matt Gibson Architecture + Design is one of them. Small house design based on minimalism and “less is more” approach can do wonders.

© courtesy of Matt Gibson Architecture + Design

Modern desert house design

Even though life in desert sounds really uncomfortable and one cannot help but wonder why would anyone want to live in a desert, this interesting modern residence designed by assemblageSTUDIO shows that it’s possible to be surrounded with nothing but rocks and sand and still enjoy in comfortable living space. This modern desert house design features a lot of innovative ideas and solutions for living in desert environment, you can read more about it here.

© Bill Timmerman

Modern villa design

This incredible modern villa designed by MM ++ Architects is part of small real estate development called Oceanique Villas, located in Phan Thiet, Vietnam. The residence features modern villa design with an incredible terrace, swimming pool and indoor outdoor connection – everything one could dream to have while living on a beach.

© Hiroyuki OKI

Walkways with staircases as part of modern house design

Next set of photos shows that modern house design includes more than just facade. Walkways and paths, as well as front yards are equally important for the house’s visual appearance as the facade itself. First project; Concrete House II by A-cero shows something really incredible – staircase leading to the house completely covered with grass. Second project; Summit House designed by Whipple Russell Architects features gorgeous walkway with lit up staircase leading to beautiful modern entrance. Third project; Sarbonne Road residence designed by McClean Design presents curved outdoor staircase with glass banister which truly complements this modern house design.

© Luis H. Segovia © Whipple Russell Architects © Hilton&Hyland

Temperate House

Discover rare and threatened plants in the world’s largest Victorian glasshouse.

Travel the world in this glittering cathedral – home to 1,500 species of plants from Africa, Australia, New Zealand, the Americas, Asia and the Pacific Islands.

Following a major five-year renovation process, the Temperate House re-opened in 2018 to showcase the splendour of the world’s temperate zones.

As temperate plants, all the species contained within its walls need to live in conditions above 10 o C to survive. Despite being the foundation of much life on Earth, many of these plants are under threat.

The Temperate House tells the story of how Kew and partners all around the world are working to rescue plants that are rare or already extinct in the wild.

Filled with 10,000 individual plants, this vast collection may help us find solutions to some of the world’s most pressing issues, from climate change to loss of biodiversity or food security.

Enriched by over 250 years of plant expertise, the freshly restored Temperate House has once again become the beating heart of Kew – an iconic landmark and a beacon of the future for plant science.

Nearest entrance

Lion Gate.
For step-free access, please follow the signs to the western side of the building.

Visiting the Temperate House

  • Our glasshouses are open until one hour before the Gardens close. Please see our opening times for full details.
  • We may occasionally need to close attractions for maintenance or visitor safety: check for planned closures and visitor notices before you visit.

Explore Temperate House

Discover some of the world’s most unique plants.

Kaka beak

Kaka beak (Clianthus maximus) is endemic to New Zealand. Its unusual common name refers to an endangered New Zealand parrot, known locally as the kaka.

Tree pincushion

Tree pincushion (Leucospermum conocarpodendron) is endemic to South Africa. Our specimen is grown from seed collected in 1803, germinated by Kew scientists.

Chilean wine palm

Chilean wine palm (Jubaea chilensis) is native to Chile in South America. Its sap has been widely used for palm wine, which can only be extracted by felling the tree.

An award-winning destination

The Temperate House was voted Best UK National Treasure at the 2018 National Geographic Traveller Magazine Reader Awards.

Acknowledgements

Kew would like to thank the Heritage Lottery Fund, Defra, Eddie and Sue Davies, The Garfield Weston Foundation, The Wolfson Foundation, The Linbury Trust, The Hartnett Conservation Trust, and other supporters.

Thanks also to donors supporting the Horticultural and Construction Apprenticeships, including the J Paul Getty Jnr Charitable Trust, the Buffini Chao Foundation, Make My Day Better, The Ingram Trust, the Harold Hyam Wingate Foundation, the Finnis Scott Foundation, the Ernest Cook Trust, CHK Charities Limited, the Sandra Charitable Trust, the Vandervell Foundation, the Radcliffe Trust, the Eranda Foundation, the Worshipful Company of Gardeners, the Lake House Charitable Foundation, the Helen Hamlyn Trust, the February Foundation, and other supporters.

About the Heritage Lottery Fund

Thanks to National Lottery players, we invest money to help people across the UK explore, enjoy and protect the heritage they care about – from the archaeology under our feet to the historic parks and buildings we love, or from precious memories and collections to rare and unique wildlife www.hlf.org.uk. Follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram and use #HLFsupported.

Discover more of Kew

Palm House

Explore the treasures of the world’s rainforests in this iconic glasshouse.

Wood like to meet: The loneliest plant in the world

Encephalartos woodii is tough, elegant and handsome. Yet, since it arrived at Kew in 1899 it has been all alone.

Plant grown from 203-year-old seed begins new life in the Temperate House

It’s not only the Temperate House that’s gained a new lease of life at Kew.

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